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Monday, 30 June 2014

Towards a Food Secure India


Title: Towards a Food Secure India 
Editors: Dr. Ranita Nagar, Sooraj Sharma
ISBN: 978-93-82395-58-4
First Edition: 2014
Binding: Hard Cover 
Language: English

About the Editors:
Dr. Ranita Nagar (MA, PhD.) is an Associate Professor of Economics and Director, Centre for Food Security and Agro Economy, Gujarat National Law University, Gandhinagar. She has to her credit numerous national and international publications and has edited books on Law and Economics, Food Security Law etc.

Sooraj Sharma is a Fifth Year Student of BA. LL.B (Hons.) at Gujarat National Law University, Gandhinagar. He has had the opportunity to intern under reputed names of the legal industry like Shri Soli Sorabjee, Shri Ram Jethmalani and Shri Iqbal Chagla to name a few. He has various international and nations publications on varying topics of national and transnational character.

About the Book:
The world today discusses ‘food’ as a ‘strategic’ commodity and its context gets further amplified as food security emerges as the road block to clear the Trade Protocol in the World Trade Organization. The stand of the developing countries is not a knee jerk reaction but a step born out of eminent necessity for sustenance. But is this the right stand for a food secure world??? Sound deliberations and policy implementation has the answer.

With a view to address the concerns of “Global Food Crisis”, the book intends to capture the growing maturity and development of an area of research encapsulating Agriculture, Food Security and its multidimensional impact. This publication promises to be a vehicle for serious academic writing across the board.


Monday, 16 June 2014

The Primitive Culture of India


Title: The Primitive Culture of India
Author: Thomas Callan Hodson 
ISBN: 978-93-82395-57-7
Reprint: 2015
Binding: Hardcover
Language: English

About the Author:
Thomas Challan Hodson occupied key administrative positions in Bengal Khasia Hills, Assam and Manipur before retiring in 1901. Later on he held positions as Hon. Secretary of Royal Anthropological Institute, reader in Ethnology, Cambridge University; and as William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology, Cambridge. He was a recipient of the coveted Silver Medal of the Royal Society of Arts. His highly acclaimed works include Primitive Culture of India; Languages Customs and Religion of India and Sensus Ethnography of India.

About the Book:
The book is the Lectures delivered in 1922 at The School of Oriental Studies (Univ. of London). Complexity of Indian Culture Analysis of Fundamental Elements Dream Values and Social Life Prepotency of the Past Mind and Body Belief in Reincarnation Language as a Social Product Assimilation of Customs and the Relations of Higher with Lower Culture Value in situ of Customs The Selective and Comparative Method Common Elements and Range of Variable Elements. Before I attempt to define the lower culture or to describe its geographical distribution in India, let me clear the ground by emphasising the fact that primitive characters are not to be looked for in Indian culture as it now is for existing savage races are not merely peoples who have been left behind in the stream of progress. They are not simply examples of early stages in the development of human culture beyond which other peoples have progressed. It can be shown that each one of them has a highly complex history in which rites and customs introduced from elsewhere, perhaps from some highly-advanced society, have blended with others of a really primitive or infantile kind. Though existing cultures may not be primitive in the sense that they represent simple and uncontaminated stages of social development, we can safely accept the primitive character of their mentality and take them as guides to the history of mental development, though they are of very questionable value as guides to the order of social development. We must therefore dismiss from our minds such catch words as arrested development or continuity of progress. Let us remember the antiquity of India, the complexity of its social groupings, and the immense range of its culture.

Friday, 6 June 2014

The Meitheis


Title: The Meitheis
Author: T.C. Hodson
ISBN: 978-93-82395-56-0
First Edition: Originally published in 1908
Reprint: 2014
Binding: Hardcover
Language: English

About the Author:
Thomas Challan Hodson occupied key administrative positions in Bengal Khasia Hills, Assam and Manipur before retiring in 1901. Later on he held positions as Hon. Secretary of Royal Anthropological Institute, reader in Ethnology, Cambridge University; and as William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology, Cambridge. He was a recipient of the coveted Silver Medal of the Royal Society of Arts. His highly acclaimed works include Primitive Culture of India; Languages Customs and Religion of India and Sensus Ethnography of India.

About the Book:

The country was divided into six pannas, Ahalup (the club of the old men), Naharup (the club of the young men), Laipham (abode of the gods), Kkabum (belonging to Khaba or bitter, from khaba), Hitakphariba (gatherer of tobacco), and Potsangba (watchmen). The earliest mention of these associations occurs in the reign of Kbirengba, A.d. 1510, and it is clear that at that time they were already military associations, and on the complete organization of the lal-lup (war club or militia), which took place in the reign of Pamheiba, they became what for some time they had been in fact, constituent parts of the militia of the country. Ahalup and Naharup seem to have been the first two to be established, and, on the creation of the Laipham and Khabam divisions, precedence was assigned to these latter over the older bodies. The precise reason for this is obscure, but may be connected with the difficulties which Pamheiba, a great reformer, experienced in introducing Hinduism as the formal religion of the State. It is now almost impossible to tell the precise conditions of membership in these associations before the period of the Burmese invasions, because the devastation of the country and its repeated depopulation completely disturbed the internal organization of the state, and the system described by Colonel McCulloch and other observers was the creation of Gambhir Singh at the comparatively recent period subsequent to the treaty of Yandabo in 1826. Nevertheless, it seems probable that the ancient model was closely followed, and that the basis of it was personal, not territorial, a feature which is due to the fact that such a system only became possible after the hegemony of the Ningthaja clan had been finally settled.

The Naga Tribes of Manipur


Title: The Naga Tribes of Manipur
Author: T.C. Hodson 
ISBN: 978-93-82395-55-3
First Edition: 1911
Reprint: 2014
Binding: Hardbound
Language: English

About the Author:
Thomas Challan Hodson occupied key administrative positions in Bengal Khasia Hills, Assam and Manipur before retiring in 1901. Later on he held positions as Hon. Secretary of Royal Anthropological Institute, reader in Ethnology, Cambridge University; and as William Wyse Professor of Social Anthropology, Cambridge. He was a recipient of the coveted Silver Medal of the Royal Society of Arts. His highly acclaimed works include Primitive Culture of India; Languages Customs and Religion of India and Census Ethnography of India.

About the Book:

Dr. Hodson, a pioneer in the field of ethnographical research of the Nagas had produced this work after years of devoted, assiduous and intensive study of the primitive people. In this volume it is proposed to describe the ethnology of the tribes inhabiting the hills which in point of area form the greater part of the State of Manipur.